Publication Details

The ecology, geopolitics, and economics of managing Lymantria dispar in the United States

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Tobin, Patrick C.; Bai, Barry B.; Eggen, Donald A.; Leonard, Donna S.

Year Published

2012

Publication

International Journal of pest Management. 58(3): 195-210.

Abstract

Increases in global trade and travel have resulted in a number of species being inadvertently (or, in a few cases, deliberately) introduced into new geographical locations. In most cases, there is generally a lack of information regarding a species' biology and ecology, and its potential to cause environmental and economic harm. Regardless, management decisions concerning these new species often need to be made rapidly, even in the absence of this information. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), is an exception insofar as it is a non-native species that, due to its considerable potential for damage, has been extensively studied and managed in the United States following its introduction in 1869. In this review, we attempt to highlight the ecology, geopolitics, and economics of managing L. dispar in the United States, integrating the lessons learned from over 100 years of research and management. In doing so, we attempt to provide a framework that could be applicable to the management of other non-native insect species, for which we often lack information upon which to develop and implement management strategies.

Keywords

barrier zone management; biological invasions; eradication; gypsy moth; invasive species management; Lymantria dispar; outbreak suppression; quarantine

Citation

Tobin, Patrick C.; Bai, Barry B.; Eggen, Donald A.; Leonard, Donna S. 2012. The ecology, geopolitics, and economics of managing Lymantria dispar in the United States. International Journal of pest Management. 58(3): 195-210. https://doi.org/10.1080/09670874.2011.647836.

Last updated on: September 11, 2012