Publication Details

Beech bark disease in West Virginia: status and impact on the Monongahela National Forest

Publication Toolbox

  • Download PDF (837603)
  • This publication is available only online.
Mielke, Manfred E.; Houston, David R.

Year Published

1983

Publication

In: Proceedings, I.U.F.R.O. Beech Bark Disease Working Party Conference; 1982 September 26-October 8; Hamden, CT. Sponsored by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-37. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 27-30.

Abstract

Cryptoeoccus fagisuga has infested over 70,000 acres (28,000 ha) of forest in West Virginia. Beech bark disease is causing heavy mortality in two areas of the Monongahela National Forest and additional scattered mortality. In the areas most affected, per-acre losses total 1,369 board feet of sawtimber and 2.67 cords, with a potential loss of 5,697 board feet and 9.29 cords. Nectria galligena appears to be the only species of Nectria involved in the disease complex.

Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Citation

Mielke, Manfred E.; Houston, David R. 1983. Beech bark disease in West Virginia: status and impact on the Monongahela National Forest. In: Proceedings, I.U.F.R.O. Beech Bark Disease Working Party Conference; 1982 September 26-October 8; Hamden, CT. Sponsored by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-37. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 27-30.

Last updated on: May 29, 2012