Publication Details

Forest management for mitigation and adaptation: insights from long-term silvicultural experiments

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Year Published

2011

Publication

Forest Ecology and Management. 262: 803-816.

Abstract

Developing management strategies for addressing global climate change has become an increasingly important issue influencing forest management around the globe. Currently, management approaches are being proposed that intend to (1) mitigate climate change by enhancing forest carbon stores and (2) foster adaptation by maintaining compositionally and structurally complex forests. However, little is known about the compatibility of these two objectives or the long-term efficacy of a given management regime at simultaneously achieving adaptation and mitigation. To address this need, we examined stand-level carbon and complexity responses using five long-term (>50 yrs) silviculture experiments within the upper Great Lakes region, USA. In particular, live tree carbon stores and sequestration rates, and compositional and structural complexity were analyzed from three thinning experiments in Pinus resinosa and two selection method experiments in northern hardwood systems to elucidate the longterm effects of management on these ecosystem attributes and the general compatibility of mitigation and adaptation objectives.

Citation

D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.; Fraver, Shawn; Palik, Brian J. 2011. Forest management for mitigation and adaptation: insights from long-term silvicultural experiments. Forest Ecology and Management. 262: 803-816. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2011.05.014.

Last updated on: February 3, 2012