Publication Details

Controlling Japanese barberry: Alternative methods and impact on tick populations

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Ward, Jeffrey S.; Williams, Scott C.; Worthley, Thomas E.

Year Published

2011

Publication

In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 650-651.

Abstract

Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) is classified as invasive in 20 states and four Canadian provinces. It is also established in another 11 states. In addition to forming dense thickets that can inhibit forest regeneration and native herbaceous plant populations, barberry understories can harbor greatly enhanced levels of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis), which transmit the causal agents of several diseases, including Lyme disease.

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Citation

Ward, Jeffrey S.; Williams, Scott C.; Worthley, Thomas E. 2011. Controlling Japanese barberry: Alternative methods and impact on tick populations. In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 650-651.

Last updated on: June 28, 2011