Publication Details

Understanding and integrating native knowledge to determine and identify high quality ash resources

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Greenlaw, Suzanne; Emery, Marla R.; Kimmerer, Robin W.; Bridgen, Michael.

Year Published

2010

Publication

In: Michler, Charles H.; Ginzel, Matthew D., eds. 2010. Proceedings of symposium on ash in North America; 2010 March 9-11; West Lafayette, IN. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-72. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 8.

Abstract

Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) is spiritually, economically, and culturally connected to Native American tribes throughout its range. Considered a cultural keystone species, black ash can be pounded and split along its growth rings to produce exceptionally strong and pliable strips to weave into baskets. Black ash harvesters and basketmakers (subsequently referred to as "experts") report increasing difficulty obtaining basket-grade wood.

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Citation

Greenlaw, Suzanne; Emery, Marla R.; Kimmerer, Robin W.; Bridgen, Michael. 2010. Understanding and integrating native knowledge to determine and identify high quality ash resources. In: Michler, Charles H.; Ginzel, Matthew D., eds. 2010. Proceedings of symposium on ash in North America; 2010 March 9-11; West Lafayette, IN. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-72. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 8.

Last updated on: December 13, 2010