Publication Details

Impact of simulated herbivory on water relations of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: the role of new tissue in the hydraulic conductivity recovery cycle

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Galvez, David A.; Tyree, M.T.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Oecologia. 161: 665-671.

Abstract

Physiological mechanisms behind plant-herbivore interactions are commonly approached as input-output systems where the role of plant physiology is viewed as a black box. Studies evaluating impacts of defoliation on plant physiology have mostly focused on changes in photosynthesis while the overall impact on plant water relations is largely unknown. Stem hydraulic conductivity (kh), stem specific conductivity (ks), percent loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), CO2 assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs) were measured on well-irrigated 1-month-old Populus tremuloides (Michx.) defoliated and control seedlings until complete refoliation.

Keywords

defoliation, gradual physiological changes, percent loss of conductivity, plant responses, refoliation process

Citation

Galvez, David A.; Tyree, M.T. 2009. Impact of simulated herbivory on water relations of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: the role of new tissue in the hydraulic conductivity recovery cycle. Oecologia. 161: 665-671. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-009-1416-8.

Last updated on: July 19, 2010