Publication Details

Living Memorials: Understanding the Social Meanings of Community-Based Memorials to September 11, 2001

Publication Toolbox

  • Download PDF (179876)
  • This publication is available only online.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Environment and Behavior. 42: 318-334.

Abstract

Living memorials are landscaped spaces created by people to memorialize individuals, places, and events. Hundreds of stewardship groups across the United States of America created living memorials in response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. This study sought to understand how stewards value, use, and talk about their living, community-based memorials. Stewards were asked to describe the intention, use, and meanings of the memorials. Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis were used to analyze 117 semi-structured interviews. Sacredness of space varied by a memorial’s site type and uses. This and other findings supported the notion of sacred space as contested space. Sacred space can be produced from acts of "setting aside" that ascribe meaning to a memorial site.

Citation

Svendsen, Erika S.; Campbell, Lindsay K. 2010. Living Memorials: Understanding the Social Meanings of Community-Based Memorials to September 11, 2001. Environment and Behavior. 42: 318-334. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013916510361871.

Last updated on: May 20, 2010