Publication Details

A space-time odyssey: movement of gypsy moth and its pathogens

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Hajek, Ann E.; Tobin, Patrick C.

Year Published

2009

Publication

In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. Proceedings. 20th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2009; 2009 January 13-16; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-51. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 34.

Abstract

Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar (L.)) populations in the United States are constantly spreading to the west and south, although spread is slowed significantly due to the activity of the Slow the Spread Program (Tobin & Blackburn 2007). As gypsy moth spreads, newly established populations can increase quickly. We investigated the period of time required for the entomopathogens and parasitoids infecting gypsy moth to catch up with newly established gypsy moth populations.

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Citation

Hajek Ann E.; Tobin, Patrick C. 2009. A space-time odyssey: movement of gypsy moth and its pathogens. In McManus, K.A.; Gottschalk K.W.; eds. Proceedings, 20th U.S. Department of Agriculture Interagency Research Forum on Invasive Species 2009; 2009 January 13-16; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-51. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 33. Abstract.

Last updated on: December 7, 2010