Publication Details

Is nut cold tolerance a limitation to the restoration of American chestnut in the northeastern United States?

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Schaberg, Paul G.; Gurney, Kendra M.; Janes, Benjamin R.; Halman, Joshua M.; Hawley, Gary J.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Ecological Restoration. 27(3): 266-268.

Abstract

American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was once a dominant hardwood species in the eastern United States, growing from Maine to Georgia and west to the Ohio Valley (Harlow et al. 1979). Arguably, American chestnut may have been the most important hardwood species in North America, renowned for its quick growth, massive size, and great utility (Harlow et al. 1979). Unfortunately, within 50 years of the introduction of chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica)--a fungal disease native to Asia--American chestnut was functionally removed as an overstory tree from eastern forests (Griffin 2000).

Citation

Schaberg, Paul G.; Gurney, Kendra M.; Janes, Benjamin R.; Halman, Joshua M.; Hawley, Gary J. 2009. Is nut cold tolerance a limitation to the restoration of American chestnut in the northeastern United States? Ecological Restoration, 27:3.266-268.

Last updated on: February 2, 2012