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Chapter 11: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Hawaiian Islands bioregion

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LaRosa, Anne Marie; Tunison, J. Timothy; Ainsworth, Alison; Kauffman, J. Boone; Hughes, R. Flint

Year Published

2008

Publication

In: Zouhar, Kristin; Smith, Jane Kapler; Sutherland, Steve; Brooks, Matthew L. Wildland fire in ecosystems: fire and nonnative invasive plants. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 225-242

Abstract

The Hawaiian Islands are national and global treasures of biological diversity. As the most isolated archipelago on earth, 90 percent of Hawaii's 10,000 native species are endemic (Gagne and Cuddihy 1999). The broad range of elevation and climate found in the Hawaiian Islands supports a range of ecosystems encompassing deserts, rain forests and alpine communities often within the span of less than 30 miles. Recent analyses suggest that species diversity may not differ between island and continental ecosystems once habitat area is taken into account (Lonsdale 1999); however there are a disproportionate number of threats to Hawaii's ecosystems.

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Citation

LaRosa, Anne Marie; Tunison, J. Timothy; Ainsworth, Alison; Kauffman, J. Boone; Hughes, R. Flint. 2008. Chapter 11: Fire and nonnative invasive plants in the Hawaiian Islands bioregion. In: Zouhar, Kristin; Smith, Jane Kapler; Sutherland, Steve; Brooks, Matthew L. Wildland fire in ecosystems: fire and nonnative invasive plants. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 225-242

Last updated on: April 7, 2011