Publication Details

Regenerating shortleaf pine: results of a 5-year cooperative research initiative

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Barnett, James P.; Brissette, John C.

Year Published

2007

Publication

In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 105-111.

Abstract

Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) is unique among the southern pines. It has the widest natural range and thrives on shallow rocky soils of the Interior Highlands, where most other pine species perform poorly. Although wood quality is excellent, it has been one of the most neglected species from both research and operational standpoints. It has a history of poor performance following outplanting with survival of less than 50 percent. The technology to change this situation was developed after formation of the Shortleaf Pine Artificial Regeneration Taskforce in 1984. Over a 6-year period, 15 studies were installed in Arkansas and Oklahoma to address seedling production and establishment. Information resulting from these studies resulted in increased seedling survival in both the Ozark and Ouachita National Forests. This paper summarizes research from these and other studies that led to the improved success in reforestation of the species.

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Citation

Barnett, James P.; Brissette, John C. 2007. Regenerating shortleaf pine: results of a 5-year cooperative research initiative. In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 105-111.

Last updated on: October 22, 2007