Publication Details

Host resistance to emerald ash borer: development of novel ash hybrids

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Year Published

2007

Publication

In: Gottschalk, Kurt W., ed. Proceedings, 17th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 2006; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-10. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 58.

Abstract

In contrast to the rapid destruction of ash trees in the United States by emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), outbreaks of EAB in Asia appear to be isolated responses to stress, such as drought, and do not devastate the ash population. This indicates that in Asia, ash trees may have a level of inherent resistance. This resistance may be the result of the co-evolution of the Asian ash species with the borer. The hypothesis that native trees may be more resistant to their native pests is upheld by several well documented examples, including a study of birch resistance to the bronze birch borer, a close relative of EAB that is native to North America (Nielsen & Herms, in prep.). In this study, 100 percent mortality was observed in Asian birch species but 75 percent of the birch species native to North America survived. Another example is the high level of resistance that the Asian silver linden has to the feeding of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) while basswood native to North America and European lindens are both seriously defoliated by the beetle.

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Citation

Koch, Jennifer L.; Carey, David W.; Larson, Richard. 2007. Host resistance to emerald ash borer: development of novel ash hybrids. In: Gottschalk, Kurt W., ed. Proceedings, 17th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 2006; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-10. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 58.

Last updated on: August 14, 2007