Publication Details

Ectomycorrhizal fungi forming symbiotic association with the American chestnut

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Year Published

2007

Publication

In: Gottschalk, Kurt W., ed. Proceedings, 17th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 2006; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-10. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 53.

Abstract

Because of the ever-increasing demand for wood and other forest products and increased restrictive regulations for harvesting trees from public land, commercial farming of forest trees is becoming a necessity. For this, it will be essential to exploit all the available commercial land, whether or not it is ideal for optimal growth of forest tree species. In addition, past use of forest lands for mining and farming have produced vast regions unsuitable for natural reforestation. In southeastern Ohio alone, there are more than 600,000 acres of land that had been subjected to mining, which are now under reclamation program. Nearly 50,000 acres have soil that has a low pH.

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Citation

Hiremath, Shiv; Lehtoma, Kirsten. 2007. Ectomycorrhizal fungi forming symbiotic association with the American chestnut. In: Gottschalk, Kurt W., ed. Proceedings, 17th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 2006; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-10. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 53.

Last updated on: August 14, 2007