Publication Details

The Hoosier-Shawnee ecological assessment: objectives, approach, and major findings

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Year Published

2004

Publication

Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-244. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station. 267 p.

Abstract

The landscapes of southern Illinois and Indiana consist of a mix of private, State, and federally owned land used in a variety of ways. The area is comprised of nearly equal proportions of forest and open or agricultural lands. It includes species and communities that contribute significantly to global biodiversity and other communities that exist in small remnants of their former distribution or in a highly degraded state. Keystone species such as the American chestnut have disappeared, and now abundant species such as oaks may be threatened by exotic pest species and alteration of historic disturbance regimes. Nearby urban areas put large recreational demands on these landscapes. The way in which these lands are managed will affect the benefits people derive from them.

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Citation

Thompson, Frank R., III. 2004. The Hoosier-Shawnee ecological assessment: objectives, approach, and major findings. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-244. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station. 267 p.

Last updated on: August 11, 2006