Publication Details

Partners in wildland fire preparedness: lessons from communities in the U.S.

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Jakes, Pamela J.; Kruger, Linda; Monroe, Martha; Sturtevant, Victoria

Year Published

2004

Publication

In: 3rd International Symposium on Human Behaviour in Fire: Public Fire Safety - Professionals in Partnership; 2004 Sept 1-3; Belfast, NI. London, UK: Interscience Communications: 139-150

Abstract

By almost any measure, the past decade has been severe in terms of wildland fire in the United States (Table 1). The National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) maintains a list of ''Historically Significant Wildfires" in the US. - fires that are significant in terms of acres burned, value of the resources destroyed, or lives or property lost. Of the 34 significant fires listed by NIFC, half have occurred since 1990. Many of these fires burned in the wildland-urban interface - the area where homes and other structures or human development intermingle with undeveloped wildland or vegetative fuels. As many structural fire fighters can attest, fire protection no longer focuses exclusively on building materials and design, but must include vegetation near the structure and across the landscape. Similarly, wildland fire fighters are finding that they now spend a significant portion of their resources protecting homes rather than forests and other natural assets. As observed by a ranger on the Custer National Forest in the state of Montana, "We're not fighting fires in the woods anymore but saving houses."

Citation

Jakes, Pamela J.; Kruger, Linda; Monroe, Martha; Nelson, Kristen; Sturtevant, Victoria. 2004. Partners in wildland fire preparedness: lessons from communities in the U.S. In: 3rd International Symposium on Human Behaviour in Fire: Public Fire Safety - Professionals in Partnership; 2004 Sept 1-3; Belfast, NI. London, UK: Interscience Communications: 139-150

Last updated on: August 2, 2007