Publication Details

Influence of weather at time of pollenation on acorn production of Quercus alba and Quercus velutina

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Cecich, Robert A.; Sullivan, Neal H.

Year Published

1999

Publication

Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 29(12): 1817-1823. (1999)

Abstract

Pistillate flower development and acorn production were observed in small populations of white oak (Quercus alba L.) and black oak (Quercus velurina Lam.) in central Missouri from 1990 to 1997. There were significant year-year differences in the size of flower crops for both species and significant tree-tree differences in black oak. About 7% of the white oak flowers matured into acorns: most flowers aborted by early July just after fertilization. About 12% of the black oak flowers matured into acorns, but some individual trees never or rarely produced a mature acorn. The number of fertilized flowers in white oak and black oak in early July was positively correlated with acorn production. Over all trees and years, the number of flowers and acorns were significantly correlated. Acorn production varied in relation to weather variables during the time of pollination. Simple regression models were good predictors of white oak acorn production but not of black oak acorn production. Maximum temperature and the number of days with hail had negative effects on acorn production. The numberof days of rain during the pollination period was positively correlated with flower survival in black oak but not with white oak.

Citation

Cecich, Robert A.; Sullivan, Neal H. 1999. Influence of weather at time of pollenation on acorn production of Quercus alba and Quercus velutina. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 29(12): 1817-1823. (1999)

Last updated on: August 11, 2006