Publication Details

Ecosystem restoration treatments affect soil physical and chemical properties in Appalachian mixed oak forests

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Boerner, Ralph E.J.; Brinkman, Jennifer a.; Yaussy, Daniel A.

Year Published

2007

Publication

e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–101. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 107-115 [CD-ROM].

Abstract

This study presents an analysis of the effect of ecosystem restoration treatments on soil properties in the oak forests of southern Ohio. The treatments were (1) prescribed fire, (2) mechanical thinning, (3) fire and thinning, and (4) passive management (control). Fire and thinning resulted in increased mineral soil exposure, with the effect decreasing by the fourth post treatment year. No significant effect on soil compaction was observed. Soil pH increased after fire and thinning+fire, but not thinning alone, and this effect persisted. P availability was lower in burned areas, whereas available Ca, K, and Al were not significantly affected. Ca:Al ratios were higher in burned areas the first year after treatment; this effect was greatly reduced by the fourth post-treatment year. These results suggest that prescribed fire and restoration thinning can be applied to this forest type without significant negative effects on the soil resource.

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Citation

Boerner, Ralph E.J.; Brinkman, Jennifer a.; Yaussy, Daniel A. 2007. Ecosystem restoration treatments affect soil physical and chemical properties in Appalachian mixed oak forests. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–101. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 107-115 [CD-ROM].

Last updated on: July 19, 2007