Publication Details

Status of neotropical migrant landbirds in the Midwest: identifying species of management concern

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Thompson, Frank R.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Green, Janet D.; Ewert, David N.

Year Published

1993

Publication

In: Finch, Deborah M.; Stangel, Peter W. (eds.). Status and management of neotropical migratory birds: September 21-25, 1992, Estes Park, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-229. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service: 145-158

Abstract

We ranked species of neotropical migrant landbirds by decreasing management concern for their viability in the Midwest. This was part of a coordinated effort by regional working groups of the Partners In Flight Program, an interagency program for the conservation of neotropical migratory birds (NTMBs). Species were ranked by seven criteria, developed by working group co-chairs and participants in the Partners in Flight Program. The first four criteria were global and do not change with the region being considered; they were global abundance, extent of winter distribution, threats on wintering grounds, and extent of breeding distribution. The last three criteria pertained specifically to the Midwest region, and included threats on the breeding grounds, the importance of the Midwest to the species, and population trends. Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data were used to score population trends, range maps and BBS density maps were used to estimate the importance of Midwest breeding habitat, and expert opinion to score breeding threats. We identified 110 NTMB species in the Midwest. The species with the highest ranks had previously been identified as federally threatened or endangered, candidates for federal listing as threatened or endangered, or species of special concern by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The closeness of the scores and the diversity of habitats within which highly ranked species occurred suggest that broad scale problems may be affecting these species on their breeding areas or that common non-breeding threats are affecting them. Alternatively, the results wuld reflect insensitivity of, or uncertainties in, the ranking system. The large number of highly ranked species in mature forest habitats, grasslands, and shrub-sapling habitats, and the high mean score of species in lowland deciduous and young conifer habitats, suggest these habitats deserve special management attention.

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Citation

Thompson, Frank R.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Green, Janet D.; Ewert, David N. 1993. Status of neotropical migrant landbirds in the Midwest: identifying species of management concern. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Stangel, Peter W. (eds.). Status and management of neotropical migratory birds: September 21-25, 1992, Estes Park, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-229. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service: 145-158

Last updated on: August 22, 2006