Scientists & Staff

Mark E. Kubiske

Notes: This person is no longer an employee of the Northern Research Station.


Featured Publications & Products

Publications & Products

Research Datasets

  • Kubiske, Mark E. 2016. Meteorological and soil temperature data from the treatment plots at the Aspen FACE Experiment, 1999-2009. Fort Collins, CO: Forest Service Research Data Archive. https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2016-0011.
  • Kubiske, Mark E. 2016. Meteorological and soil moisture data from an ambient monitoring station at the Aspen FACE Experiment, 1999-2009. Fort Collins, CO: Forest Service Research Data Archive. https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2016-0012.
  • Kubiske, Mark E.; Foss, Anita R. 2015. Carbon dioxide and ozone data from the Aspen FACE Experiment, 1998-2009, and Phase II Experiment, 2010. Fort Collins, CO: Forest Service Research Data Archive. https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2015-0001.
  • Kubiske, Mark E. 2013. Tree height and diameter data from the Aspen FACE Experiment, 1997-2008. Newtown Square, PA: USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2013-0015.

National Research Highlights

Samples from increment borer shows the growth of a tree.  Does increasing CO2 affect the maximum number of trees that can be sustained in a forest?  If it does then all forest density management guides need a revision.

Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration alters forest stand development, so do management guidelines need revision?

Year: 2017

A decade ago, increased atmospheric carbon dioxide was at the heart of the Aspen Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Experiment. Forest Service researchers in Rhinelander, Wisc., wanted to know if these increases affected forest growth. What they discovered raises the possibility that principles of stand development and size-density relationships are already obsolete.

Aerial view of the Aspen FACE experiment showing the control facilities (middle left), and the 12 atmospheric treatment rings of four treatments with three replicates.  In the ring at bottom center, the different model forest communities are visible. David F. Karnosky, Michigan Tech University.

Scientists Predict Survivability Factors for Northern Forests Given Elevated CO2 and Ozone Levels

Year: 2013

The researchers scaled up a high-profile 11-year ecosystem experiment called Aspen-FACE to assess how elevated carbon dioxide and ozone levels might impact real forests at the landscape scale over the course of many future decades. They determined that there will be winners and losers among species and within species groups but that managers can have considerable control over the outcomes by managing disturbance effects on forests and landscape spatial patterns. The researchers also found that changes will be gradual and that few species are likely to disappear completely because of carbon dioxide and ozone effects alone.

Last modified: Sunday, November 18, 2018