Northern Research Station News Releases

Media Contact

Resources

Web Resources

Photo Gallery

Eastern Golden Eagle Research, Conservation Honored by Wings Across the Americas

ARLINGTON, Va., March 28, 2013 - On Wednesday, the U.S. Forest Service's Wings Across the Americas program honored the Eastern Golden Eagle Working Group, an international collaboration of biologists and wildlife managers from 20 institutions in the United States and Canada, with its 2013 Research and Management Partnership Award.

Headed by Todd Katzner, a research biologist jointly funded by the U.S. Forest Service and West Virginia University, and Charles Maisonneuve of the Ministère des Ressources naturelles in Quebec, the Golden Eagle Working Group is identifying gaps in knowledge, prioritizing research needs, promoting science-based conservation and management actions, increasing public and governmental awareness, and coordinating the activities of managers and biologists.

"We all accomplish more when we join forces, and the Golden Eagle Working Group truly exemplifies the power of collaboration in science and conservation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the U.S. Forest Service's Northern Research Station.

The small population of golden eagles in Eastern North America faces challenges that range from diminishing habitat, to incidental capture in traps, to wind turbines. Since its inception in 2010, the Eastern Golden Eagle Working Group has marshaled technology, research and enthused citizens to assess the species' status and raise awareness of the threats they face.

Projects include a "camera trapping" program, in which approximately 200 volunteers and organizations support 150 trail camera stations from Maine to Georgia, including some on experimental research forests managed by the Forest Service. Camera stations are helping researchers to evaluate the population status not only of golden eagles, but also of other species, including bald eagle, red-shouldered hawk, eastern spotted skunk, fisher, and bobcat.

The Working Group has also partnered with Appalachian Mountains Joint Venture and other regional groups to coordinate conservation and research efforts for golden eagles in the Appalachian region.

"Our objective is to ensure the long-term sustainability of Eastern golden eagle populations and to make the species a flagship for landscape-scale conservation," Katzner said. "The survival of a charismatic species like the golden eagle truly demonstrates that in the eastern United States, healthy populations of wildlife are not mutually exclusive with large human populations"

The Eastern Golden Eagle Working Group has extensive outreach efforts designed to share its images and information with the public. It has developed several web sites (www.egewg.org; www.appalachianeagles.org) that shares images captured at the camera trapping sites and encourages additional volunteers to join the effort. Teachers' use of the Working Group's golden eagle data and images in the classroom has connected future generations of biologists and ornithologists with the Working Group.
Wings Across the Americas is sponsored by U.S. Forest Service programs including the National Forest System, State & Private Forestry, Research & Development and International Programs. Wings Across the Americas works with a wide range of partners in the United States and overseas to conserve habitats and populations of birds, bats, butterflies, and dragonflies.

Since its founding in 1867 as a public land-grant institution, West Virginia University has embraced a mission of providing excellence in teaching, research, and service. Located in Morgantown, West Virginia, about 70 miles south of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with regional campuses across West Virginia, WVU's fall 2012 main campus enrollment was 29,707 (all campuses 32,593). WVU is one of the few schools in the country that are land-grant, doctoral research universities with a comprehensive medical school. WVU offers 184 degree programs at the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels through 14 colleges and schools, including five professional schools: dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and the state's only law school, and a new School of Public Health. Over 185,000 alumni have been prepared for personal and career success.

The mission of the U.S. Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation's forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of our nation's forests; 850 million acres including 100 million acres of urban forests where most Americans live. The mission of the Forest Service's Northern Research Station is to improve people's lives and help sustain the natural resources in the Northeast and Midwest through leading-edge science and effective information delivery.

The U.S. Forest Service is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a mission of sustaining the health, diversity and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The mission of the Forest Service's Northern Research Station is to improve people’s lives and help sustain the natural resources in the Northeast and Midwest through leading-edge science and effective information delivery.

The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Public lands the Forest Service manages contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the nation’s clean water supply, a value estimated at $7.2 billion per year. The agency has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of the 850 million forested acres within the U.S., of which 100 million acres are urban forests where most Americans live. For more information, visit www.fs.usda.gov/.

###

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs). Remedies and complaint filing deadlines vary by program or incident. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To file a program discrimination complaint, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at https://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.


Last modified: March 28, 2013