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Hmong Americans and public lands in Minnesota and Wisconsin

  • Bengston, David N.
  • Schermann, Michele A.
  • Moua, MiaKia
  • Lee, Tou Thai

Year Published

2008

Source

In: Weber, Samantha; Harmon, David, eds. Rethinking protected areas in a changing world: Proceedings of the 2007 GWS biennial conference on parks, protected areas, and cultural sites. Hancock, MI: The George Wright Society: 30-35.

Abstract

Natural resource managers and policy-makers need to understand the cultures and perspectives of ethnic minority communities in order to serve them effectively. In this exploratory study, we focus on Hmong Americans, perhaps the least-studied and -understood Asian ethnic group in the United States. The Hmong, who lived in the mountains of Laos, were relatively isolated until they were secretly recruited and armed by the United States Central Intelligence Agency in the early 1960s to fight the communist Pathet Lao and their North Vietnamese allies (Warner 1998). When the Americans abruptly withdrew from Vietnam and Laos and the pro-American Royal Laotian government collapsed in 1975, the Hmong fled persecution and annihilation from the new communist regime.

Citation

Bengston, David N.; Schermann, Michele A.; Moua, MiaKia; Lee, Tou Thai 2008. Hmong Americans and public lands in Minnesota and Wisconsin. In: Weber, Samantha; Harmon, David, eds. Rethinking protected areas in a changing world: Proceedings of the 2007 GWS biennial conference on parks, protected areas, and cultural sites. Hancock, MI: The George Wright Society: 30-35.
Last updated on: October 8, 2009

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