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Northern white-cedar ecology and silviculture in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada: a synthesis of knowledge

Year Published

2009

Source

Northern Journal of Applied Forestry. 26(1): 21-27.

Abstract

Sustainability of the northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) resource is a concern in many regions throughout its range because of regeneration failures, difficulty recruiting seedlings into sapling and pole classes, and harvesting levels that exceed growth. Management confusion has resulted from the scarcity of research on northern white-cedar ecology and silviculture, particularly because northern white-cedar is an anomalous tree species. This article synthesizes recent and historical northern white-cedar literature, with a focus on ecology, regeneration, cedar-wildlife interactions, and silviculture. Although a number of past studies have produced contradictory findings, some generalizations of use to the practitioner can be made: northern white-cedar is of small stature, slow growing, decay prone except on cliff sites, and found in both early- and late-successional stands. Northern white-cedar appears to be a highly variable species that can adapt to a wide range of environmental stresses. Because management of this resource has proven difficult, northern white-cedar silvicultural guidelines are needed throughout its range.

Keywords

Citation

Hofmeyer, Philip V.; Kenefic, Laura S.; Seymour, Robert S. 2009. Northern white-cedar ecology and silviculture in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada: a synthesis of knowledge. Northern Journal of Applied Forestry. 26(1): 21-27.
Last updated on: April 30, 2009

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