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The effects of partial cutting practices on forest stand structure in Appalachian hardwood forests

Year Published

1997

Publication

In: Pallardy, Stephen G.; Cecich, Robert A.; Garrett, H. Gene; Johnson, Paul S., eds. Proceedings of the 11th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-188. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 284

Abstract

Eastern hardwood forests originated after catastrophic disturbances around the turn of the century and are currently an even-aged, maturing resource. The increasing value of sawlogs, especially those of particular species and quality, has prompted many forest landowners to increase their harvesting efforts. Most harvesting appears to be economically driven, focusing on sawlog extraction without regard to the future of the residual stand. Partial cutting practices, such as diameter limit cutting, remove the highest quality material and leave inferior species and quality behind. None of these cutting practices are part of any planned silvicultural system and may alter future forest sustainability.

Citation

Fajvan, Mary Ann; Grushecky, Shawn T. 1997. The effects of partial cutting practices on forest stand structure in Appalachian hardwood forests. In: Pallardy, Stephen G.; Cecich, Robert A.; Garrett, H. Gene; Johnson, Paul S., eds. Proceedings of the 11th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-188. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 284
Last updated on: February 1, 2007

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