You are here: NRS Home / Publications & Data / Growth comparison of northern white-cedar to balsam fir and red spruce by site class

Publication Details

Publication Toolbox
  • Download PDF  (604 KB)
  • This publication is available only online.

Growth comparison of northern white-cedar to balsam fir and red spruce by site class

Year Published

2006

Publication

In: Proceedings of the Eastern US-Canada forest science conference; 2006 October 19-21; Quebec, QC: 62-66.

Abstract

Though northern white-cedar is a common and economically important component of the Acadian Forest of Maine and adjacent Canada, there is little regional data about the growth and development of this species. Sixty sites in northern Maine were used to compare growth of cedar to that of red spruce and balsam fir along a range of site classes and light exposures. On average, cedar grew faster than spruce but slower than fir, however species-specific basal area growth rates were affected differently by site class and light exposure. Balsam fir was the only species showing strong growth responses to increased crown light levels. Decay was present in all species, but a higher proportion of cedar stems were decayed. The proportion of decayed balsam fir stems increased as site drainage improved. Our data suggest that cedar in Maine often exceed 150 years of readable rings at breast height.

Citation

Hofmeyer, Philip V.; Kenefic, Laura S.; Seymour, Robert S.; Brissette, John C. 2006. Growth comparison of northern white-cedar to balsam fir and red spruce by site class. In: Proceedings of the Eastern US-Canada forest science conference; 2006 October 19-21; Quebec, QC: 62-66.
Last updated on: May 9, 2008

NRS at a Glance