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Biological control of emerald ash borer in North America: current progress and potential for success

Year Published

2012

Source

International Organization for Biological Control Nearctic Regional Section Newsletter. 34(1): 5. [Abstract].

Abstract

The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis), a buprestid native to north-east Asia, was first discovered in North America near Detroit in 2002. EAB has since spread to at least 15 U.S. States and two Canadian provinces, threatening the existence of native ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). A classical biocontrol program was initiated by the USDA Forest Service and APHIS immediately following the discovery of EAB, and led to introduction of three species of hymen-opteran parasitoids in 2007: Spathius agrili (Braconidae), Tetrastichus planipennisi (Eupelmidae), and Oobius agrili (Encyrtidae).

Citation

Duan, Jian J.; Bauer, Leah S.; Gould, Juli R.; Lelito, Jonathan P. 2012. Biological control of emerald ash borer in North America: current progress and potential for success. International Organization for Biological Control Nearctic Regional Section Newsletter. 34(1): 5. [Abstract].
Last updated on: September 11, 2012

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