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Restoring Oaks in the Missouri River Floodplain

Year Published

2001

Publication

In: Smalley, Bryan, ed. Proceedings of the 29th Annual Hardwood Symposium: Sustaining Natural Resources on Private Lands in the Central Hardwood Region; French Lick, IN: 8-20

Abstract

Restoration of native vegetation and hydrologic regimes in the Mississippi and Missouri River floodplains is problematic because they are among the most altered ecosystems in North America (Noss et al. 1995), and because of the competing demands placed on these river ecosystems by commercial, private and social interests. Since the 1780s, more than half (53 percent) of the original wetlands have been lost in the conterminous United States, due primarily to drainage and conversion to agriculture (Dahl 1990) (Table 1). Many states in the Midwest and South have lost more than 85 percent of their original wetlands. In the eastern United States, many of these wetlands were originally forested (Bragg and Tatschl 1977, The Nature Conservancy 1992).

Citation

Dey, Dan; Kabrick, John; Grabner, Jennifer; Gold, Mike 2001. Restoring Oaks in the Missouri River Floodplain. In: Smalley, Bryan, ed. Proceedings of the 29th Annual Hardwood Symposium: Sustaining Natural Resources on Private Lands in the Central Hardwood Region; French Lick, IN: 8-20
Last updated on: August 11, 2006

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