You are here: NRS Home / Publications & Data / Assessing urban forest effects and values, Los Angeles' urban forest

Publication Details

Assessing urban forest effects and values, Los Angeles' urban forest

Year Published

2011

Publication

Resour. Bull. NRS-47. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 30 p.

Abstract

An analysis of trees in Los Angeles, CA, reveals that this area has about 6 million trees with tree and shrub canopies that cover 24.9 percent of the city. The most common tree species are Italian cypress, scrub oak, laurel sumac, Mexican fan palm, and Indian laurel, Trees in Los Angeles currently store about 1.3 million tons of carbon (4.7 million tons CO2) valued at $26.3 million. In addition, these trees remove about 77,000 tons of carbon per year (282,000 tons CO2/year) ($1.6 million per year) and about 1,976 tons of air pollution per year ($14.2 million per year). Los Angeles' trees are estimated to reduce annual residential energy costs by $10.2 million per year. The structural value of the trees is estimated at $12.4 billion. Information on the structure and functions of the urban forest can be used to inform urban forest management programs and to integrate urban forests within plans to improve environmental quality in Los Angeles.

Keywords

Citation

Nowak, David J.; Hoehn, Robert E. III; Crane, Daniel E.; Weller, Lorraine; Davila, Antonio. 2011. Assessing urban forest effects and values, Los Angeles’ urban forest. Resour. Bull. NRS-47. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 30 p.
Last updated on: April 20, 2011

NRS at a Glance